Category Archives: Updates On Oppression & Resistance In The Motherland

Palermo is a laboratory for the precariat by Jamie Mackay on openDemocracy

https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/jamie-mackay/palermo-is-laboratory-for-precariat

Rome’s rebel lake is a parable of the contemporary commons | openDemocracy

Earlier this year, activists in Rome won the right to self-manage a vast lake in an impoverished area of Rome. Read Jamie Mackay’s editorial on openDemocracy:

Rome’s rebel lake is a parable of the contemporary commons | openDemocracy

Like father, like son: Fascists of the 3rd Millennium

Two policemen are under investigation for covering up a fascist brawl that involved Rome’s Mayor’s son, Manfredi Alemanno. According to Rome’s Public Prosecutors the inquiry that had followed the event was obstructed and then buried under the sand by the Police, thanks to the withholding of evidence and false statements made by policemen Roberto Macellaro (who in his free time volunteers to be the Mayor’s personal chauffeur) and Pietro Ronca, a local Chief Inspector in Rome. These two helped Manfredi Alemanno “disappear” from the scene after the beating had concluded, and then lied about what had really happened. Continue reading

March of discontent: lessons in work struggles

sciopero-22

March 22 2013: let’s dump the bosses
Logistics workers strike
Block the goods, generalise the struggle, united we win!

The working class is awakening, and the mobilisations of the last few days among the logistics sector workers in Emilia Romagna are the first signs.  Recently, we have seen two different images of work struggles: the Peugeot workers in Paris clashing with the police on one hand; and the sad, resigned-looking picket organised by Fiom outside a Fiat establishment in Italy, on the other hand. Both are fighting for their jobs, but the differences are clearly visible and stimulate many diverse reflections. The French workers’ determination in defense of their rights and dignity has spread to the Italian logistics sector workers’ mobilisation on March 22, and manifested in their determination to defeat the enemy. Workers of different backgrounds and origins, Italians and migrants, have united against the exploitation carried on by the “cooperatives” (employment agencies) owners and the main cooperative, the Coop. Continue reading

The Italian Carnival of 2013: Articles On The Elections

Italy

Viareggio’s Carnival

Here is a collection of articles on the Italian elections from the media and some fellow bloggers. I don’t necessarily share the views expressed in all these articles, but they make for some interesting reads. Continue reading

Monti’s government “democratic and sober” response to the crisis and social unrest

The demonstrations that took place all over Italy on 14th November as part of a European Day of Action against austerity are already setting the pace of the new management of public order. In Rome in particular it’s been forbidden for months to get anywhere close to the political headquarters during demonstrations, despite the revocation of the decrees introduced last year by the Mayor to turn the whole of the city centre into a red zone.

Continue reading

On the state of movements: let’s open the debate

Some American and European comrades have asked me, Why didn’t you have an Occupy movement in Italy? Why is the NO TAV movement the only expression of social struggle? The NO TAV, despite their strong success, despite their original expression of post-modernity class war, lack the characteristics of the Occupy movements: an extension of social change, the power to remove old hierarchies, and, above all, a shared and “common” political dynamic open to radical political upheavals.

But here’s another paradox: what sense does this question have now? The Occupy movements seem already dead. The Arab springs have mostly been crashed by military coups and civil wars, or have ended up producing Islamic regimes that seem to forecast the repression of freedoms and political practices only just discovered – the continuation of the status quo under a different name, possibly even worse than the old theological-political dictatorships. In Europe, movements have been suffocated by the unhealthy atmosphere brought over by the economic crisis, while in the States they are just about to be swallowed by the political structures that nowadays dominate the electoral deadlines. Continue reading